A Peek Into Our Holy Week

As you begin to make plans for Holy Week with kids in your domestic church, I thought I’d share what has worked for us as a family over the years. Some of what follows is flexible and subject to change each year based on our schedules, kids’ ages and temperaments, and parental level of exhaustion, but this is the general outline of what Holy Week looks like for us as a Catholic family.  Thoughts in red are new things we plan to implement with the kids this liturgical year!

Holy Week

Palm Sunday/Monday/Tuesday – Clean the house, top to bottom, to prepare our home for the Triduum and Easter. On Sunday, we will read this new book from Michele Chronister that I purchased last week. The explanations of the Liturgies of Holy Week are written for probably 5-7 years olds, but the lovely illustrations will delight kids of any age, and the simple summaries of each Liturgy are a great jumping off point for deeper discussions with older kids.

Spy Wednesday – Hide 30 pieces of “silver” (quarters) around the house to remember that the day before Holy Thursday, Judas betrayed Our Lord for 30 pieces of silver. Once the kids find them all, they can put them in the box for the poor at Church tomorrow evening. I shamelessly stole this idea from Catholic All Year. SHAMELESSLY. Continue reading

When Jesus Hides Himself

Veiled Hearts

Today is the 5th Sunday of Lent, and so marks the beginning of Passiontide. Traditionally,  this timeframe of the last two weeks of Lent was primarily focused on the faithful’s immersion into Christ’s Passion. Gradually, this two-week observance has been largely condensed into a liturgically rich Holy Week. Prior to Vatican II and the reorganization of the Missal, the reading for the 5th Sunday of Lent (today) from John 8 ended with the words “Jesus hid himself and went out of the Temple.” As a symbol of Christ’s hiding, the crucifix, sacred art, and statuary are often veiled in Catholic churches on the Saturday before the beginning of Passiontide. There are many possible explanations of the origin of this tradition, and you can read more about the significance of this there.

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