Keep Calm and Pray On

“All bitterness, fury, anger, shouting, and reviling must be removed from you, along with all malice. And be kind to one another, compassionate, forgiving one another as God has forgiven you in Christ.” Ephesians 4:31-32

Something to ponder and keep close to heart as we approach this election, and the clamoring din rises to a crescendo on social media, on tv, and elsewhere. Remember that everyone, even those in the comboxes online and those holding protest signs, are our brothers and sisters in Christ.

Remember that there is no such thing as evil men, only men who do evil things.  Everyone is a child of God, regardless of their sin. Everyone deserves compassion and mercy, by virtue of their inherent dignity as a person. We are called to

Cast your vote well – not out of fear, but for the candidate you feel is the best person for the job. Explore third parties. Vote your conscience, but don’t yell at others for voting theirs. You alone are responsible for your own actions. And, as St. Pio once said – “Pray, hope, and don’t worry.”

God is still in control. We are still His.

How We’re Piecing Together the Ideal Religious Formation for Our Children

This is a great overview approach to religious formation for parents who have kids in secular schools and/or who work outside the home, as well. For our family, we do most of the below. We also try to live the liturgical year as much as possible, incorporating cuisine and prayers that pertain to feast days. We also celebrate our kids’ feast days as if they were birthday celebrations.

Overheard at the Edwards'...

aaronchurch My son, visiting Jesus.

I am a pastoral minister by profession. I have a degree in Theology, and I’m enraptured with all things related to Catholic doctrine and spirituality. At heart, I’m an evangelist, and therefore, my children’s formation is exceedingly important to me. I want them to know the faith, but more importantly, I want them to be disciples of Jesus Christ. I don’t want them to become a statistic.

I’m not going to sugar coat things. For the past 40+ years, the Catholic Church in America has been following a religious education model that is not as effective as it once was. The culture has shifted right out from under the feet of pastoral ministers working diligently to pass on the faith. Further, as Sherry Weddell says in her book, Forming Intentional Disciples, a majority of Catholics in our country have been sacramentalized, but not effectively evangelized.


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Little Bit O’ Lagniappe [vol. 6]

Little Bit O' Lagniappe

Natural Beauty

I’m surrounded by natural beauty – most notably in the beautiful squishiness of our newest addition, Beckett. He was born on a very hot, humid August day – the feast of St. Dominic. The doctor was a bit late to the delivery because the elevator was out of order, and he almost arrived without her assistance. He’s a squishy, fat, bundle of love of which his older siblings can’t get enough.  I’m spending my maternity leave soaking in his goodness – the smell of his milky breath, the rolls upon rolls of baby fat, and the quiet calmness of his coos. I’m in awe of this little man.


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Pray, Hope, and Don’t Worry – Sometimes, Easier Said Than Done

More often than not lately, I’m empathizing with the Israelites and their golden calf worship. OK, not really the ones that did the actual worshipping, but more like the ones who awkwardly stood on the edges of the crowd watching everything go down but doing nothing to stop it. I would’ve been one of the ones, mouth agape, discreetly taking pics on my phone to post to IG with the hashtag #prayforthesedamnedfools while secretly agreeing with them in frustration. Now before you go thinking I’m going to melt down all of my gold jewelry (all four pieces) and cast them into the likeness of Elsie the cow, let me explain a bit.
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That Time the Triduum Triumphed

It was 2014. We were set to move out of our home two weeks after Easter, and, as my procrastinating self would have it, I’d yet to pack anything other than books. I decided that we’d spend the Triduum (Holy Thursday, Good Friday, and Holy Saturday) purging and packing, and this process would yield to an Easter Sunday with far less clutter – an excellent metaphor for the New Life we were entering with our new house. You know what they say about plans and making God laugh. On Good Friday, I decided to make falafel for supper – a tradition I’d started the year before, and we loved so much that we’ve kept it up. Because it’s a rather involved process, I didn’t get the kitchen cleaned until rather late, and I fell into bed exhausted.
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